Posted on June 17, 2012 with 27 notes.
Tagged with eastern green mamba, dendroaspis, elapidae, snake, reptile, info, request, front fanged, venomous, .

Camera: Olympus SP550UZ
Aperture: f/3.4
Exposure: 1/50th
Focal Length: 9mm
Exif Data Zoom Unlike its much larger cousin the Black mamba, the Eastern Green Mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) is very shy and generally not aggressive. It will avoid confrontation with humans or other potential predators when possible, and will rather rely on its camouflage, or flee, than alert a potential threat of its presence. They are fast snakes, capable of moving 7 mph. They don’t always strike, but under continuous harassment and provocation and especially if cornered, they may suddenly become very ferocious and strike repeatedly in quick succession.
The eastern green mamba is solitary, except during mating. Males find females by following a scent trail. Male eastern green mambas will compete with other males with a ritual dance or wrestling contest on the ground, in which one male tries to force the other down. These combats may last for several hours, during which the males abstain from biting. Courtship and mating then take place in the trees, after which the female lays between 6-17 eggs (average of 10-15 eggs are usually laid).The eggs are usually laid in a hollow tree among decaying vegetation and after a little over three months, the young mambas hatch. The juveniles are between 35 - 45cm (13 to 18in) in length and are venomous from birth. This species can live up to 15–25 years.
Photo taken by Danny Breetveld

Unlike its much larger cousin the Black mamba, the Eastern Green Mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) is very shy and generally not aggressive. It will avoid confrontation with humans or other potential predators when possible, and will rather rely on its camouflage, or flee, than alert a potential threat of its presence. They are fast snakes, capable of moving 7 mph. They don’t always strike, but under continuous harassment and provocation and especially if cornered, they may suddenly become very ferocious and strike repeatedly in quick succession.

The eastern green mamba is solitary, except during mating. Males find females by following a scent trail. Male eastern green mambas will compete with other males with a ritual dance or wrestling contest on the ground, in which one male tries to force the other down. These combats may last for several hours, during which the males abstain from biting. Courtship and mating then take place in the trees, after which the female lays between 6-17 eggs (average of 10-15 eggs are usually laid).The eggs are usually laid in a hollow tree among decaying vegetation and after a little over three months, the young mambas hatch. The juveniles are between 35 - 45cm (13 to 18in) in length and are venomous from birth. This species can live up to 15–25 years.

Photo taken by Danny Breetveld

  1. webherps reblogged this from reptilefacts
  2. whistlinginthearches reblogged this from constellating
  3. constellating reblogged this from shibakisses
  4. shibakisses reblogged this from reptilefacts
  5. benevolentwanderer reblogged this from snakelips
  6. savyjanep reblogged this from reptiglo
  7. mystikallychallenged reblogged this from glitterprincessx
  8. glitterprincessx reblogged this from reptiglo
  9. splitsoulsister reblogged this from snakelips
  10. snakelips reblogged this from reptiglo
  11. reptiglo reblogged this from reptilefacts
  12. pookascrayon said: *absolutely delighted* Yay, mambamambamamba!
  13. soaked-grass reblogged this from reptilefacts
  14. reptilefacts posted this