libutron:

Woma python  (Ramsay’s Python, Woma)

The Woma python is an Endangered python belonging to the species Aspidites ramsayi (Pythonidae), distinguished from other Australian pythons by its narrow head which is barely distinct from the neck.

This species is found in the Australian interior, from central Australia into the south-western edge of Queensland, and into northern South Australia. There is also one coastal area in north-eastern Australia around the Pilbara coast where this species is found.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

07.26.14 ♥ 124
I think if you look at Varanids it becomes a lot easier to see individual personalities. If you compare two identical monitors together, no two will act the same. They have different food preferences, and housing choices.

Asked by p-regius

07.26.14 ♥ 2
I want to ask about your opinion on something, what's your opinion on reptile psychology? Do you think they have differing personalities by individual? Are you upset by their supposed lack of ability to have complex emotions such as happiness? If it was possible would you want to give them complex emotions? Just wondering.......

Asked by gtfo-im-a-turtle

markscherz:

Reptiles are not simple animals. They exhibit some really complex behaviour, and some really simple behaviour. Because we don’t really understand the complex behaviour as well, most people dismiss it and concentrate on the fact that reptiles exhibit some extremely simple, stereotyped behaviours, especially in territoriality, hunting, and mating.

We judge emotions from a mammalian perspective. Mammals have great emotional indicators: eyebrows, lips, eyes, tails, general body stance - all of these have fairly stereotypical expressions to express emotions in mammals. In reptiles, there is practically no muscular control of particular parts of the face; the stance is not very expressive; the tail moves for a variety of reasons. The ability to express an emotion does not preclude the ability to feel it. We honestly don’t know if herps are able to be happy or sad. We know that they can get depressed, but depression is more of a chemical imbalance than an emotion.

As for wanting to give them things that they have (maybe) not evolved, I like them the way they are. If they had evolved differently, I would like them that way too.

07.26.14 ♥ 69
Camera: Canon EOS 40D
Aperture: f/11
Exposure: 1/3th
Focal Length: 330mm
Exif Data Zoom Up close with a Common Sun Skink (Eutropis multifasciatus). Selangor, Malaysia

Up close with a Common Sun Skink (Eutropis multifasciatus). Selangor, Malaysia

07.25.14 ♥ 46

markscherz:

Pyxis arachnoides, the spider tortoise.

Photo by markren

07.25.14 ♥ 113
07.24.14 ♥ 641

1800daniel:

Lampropeltis californiae * - California Kingsnake

I crossed paths with a battle-scarred kingsnake. These photos don’t show off some of the scars but you might see them in the photos I’ll post later.

Riverside County, California

Lampropeltis getula californiae

07.24.14 ♥ 71

mkmorphs:

Comparison Photo: Cinnamon and Hypo Cinnamon

07.23.14 ♥ 168
libutron:

Vogel’s pit viper
Viridovipera vogeli (Viperidae), the Vogel’s pit viper, is a venomous, Asian pit viper found in the southern portion of the Indochinese peninsula, from the western Dongraek Mountains of eastern Thailand through southern Laos, central and southern Vietnam, and Cambodia.
This species was previously recognized in the genus Trimeresurus. However, it was redescribed by Malhotra et al. (2004), who clarified the distribution of this snake based on voucher specimens. 
Viridovipera vogeli exhibits a general green color pattern, with red elements considerably reduced (no red in eyes or tail, and only a faint red lateral stripe present in some males).
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Jeremy Holden
Locality: Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia

libutron:

Vogel’s pit viper

Viridovipera vogeli (Viperidae), the Vogel’s pit viper, is a venomous, Asian pit viper found in the southern portion of the Indochinese peninsula, from the western Dongraek Mountains of eastern Thailand through southern Laos, central and southern Vietnam, and Cambodia.

This species was previously recognized in the genus Trimeresurus. However, it was redescribed by Malhotra et al. (2004), who clarified the distribution of this snake based on voucher specimens. 

Viridovipera vogeli exhibits a general green color pattern, with red elements considerably reduced (no red in eyes or tail, and only a faint red lateral stripe present in some males).

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jeremy Holden

Locality: Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia

07.23.14 ♥ 242
Camera: SONY DSC-WX150
Aperture: f/3.3
Exposure: 1/30th
Focal Length: 4mm
Exif Data Zoom crispysnakes:

Come on folks, there are only a few days left to comment on this!  Deadline is July 24th!  This Thursday!

All Americans who appreciate their freedom to have pets should comment. This may only affect big snake keepers now, but any species could be the next target. The entire pet community is being picked apart as we are not supporting each other in protecting our freedoms. Support your pet and reptile community and comment today! Over 80 million American households have pets. Over five million of those have pet reptiles. There should be tens or hundreds of thousands of comments made against adding additional species to the Constrictor Rule. This needs to be shared! Below are Talking Points, comment links, mailing address, sample letter, FAQ and more. 
Deadline is July 24 (no extension): Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is taking additional comments regarding listing five species of snakes (Boa constrictor, Reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Green anaconda and Beni anaconda) as injurious under the Lacey Act. These species were originally proposed in 2010. If listed, FWS would ban interstate transportation/commerce and importation. Remember to be professional and civil with your comments.
Comments must be submitted at www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570 and clicking Comment Now! in the upper right. You may also comment at www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570.



WHAT’S THIS ABOUT?  WHAT CAN YOU WRITE?  CLICK HERE AND SCROLL DOWN.



Please guys, if you haven’t yet, go visit the site and comment to defend our ability to keep our animals.  If you missed why this is so important to us (and me) last time, it’s this: once added to the Lacey act, these animals cannot be moved or sold across state lines. 


For me, and in time you (you know they’re coming for BPs and smaller exotics next, just look at the bans coming out of West Virginia and the Carolinas), this means:

1.  If you get a job in another state or have to move to another state, you cannot take your pet(s) with you like a responsible owner.
2.  If your vet is across state lines or you have to seek medical attention for your animal across state lines, you can’t take it there.
3.  You can’t ship in or ship out from your state, destroying any chance at a solid business.
4.  Do you travel from state to state doing educational programs with your animals?  Good luck.  You might be able to get a permit for it.  Maybe.  If they’re feeling generous.
5.  Conservation through captive breeding?  Not anymore. 

And if you get caught trying to take your pet or sell your stock over state lines?
1.  Up to $10,000 in fines
2.  Jail time
3.  Congratulations, you are now a felon.

So again, please help us stop this assault on responsible reptile ownership.

crispysnakes:

Come on folks, there are only a few days left to comment on this!  Deadline is July 24th!  This Thursday!

All Americans who appreciate their freedom to have pets should comment. This may only affect big snake keepers now, but any species could be the next target. The entire pet community is being picked apart as we are not supporting each other in protecting our freedoms. Support your pet and reptile community and comment today! Over 80 million American households have pets. Over five million of those have pet reptiles. There should be tens or hundreds of thousands of comments made against adding additional species to the Constrictor Rule. This needs to be shared! Below are Talking Points, comment links, mailing address, sample letter, FAQ and more. 

Deadline is July 24 (no extension): Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is taking additional comments regarding listing five species of snakes (Boa constrictor, Reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Green anaconda and Beni anaconda) as injurious under the Lacey Act. These species were originally proposed in 2010. If listed, FWS would ban interstate transportation/commerce and importation. Remember to be professional and civil with your comments.

Comments must be submitted at www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570 and clicking Comment Now! in the upper right. You may also comment at www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570.
Please guys, if you haven’t yet, go visit the site and comment to defend our ability to keep our animals.  If you missed why this is so important to us (and me) last time, it’s this: once added to the Lacey act, these animals cannot be moved or sold across state lines. 
For me, and in time you (you know they’re coming for BPs and smaller exotics next, just look at the bans coming out of West Virginia and the Carolinas), this means:
1.  If you get a job in another state or have to move to another state, you cannot take your pet(s) with you like a responsible owner.
2.  If your vet is across state lines or you have to seek medical attention for your animal across state lines, you can’t take it there.
3.  You can’t ship in or ship out from your state, destroying any chance at a solid business.
4.  Do you travel from state to state doing educational programs with your animals?  Good luck.  You might be able to get a permit for it.  Maybe.  If they’re feeling generous.
5.  Conservation through captive breeding?  Not anymore. 
And if you get caught trying to take your pet or sell your stock over state lines?
1.  Up to $10,000 in fines
2.  Jail time
3.  Congratulations, you are now a felon.
So again, please help us stop this assault on responsible reptile ownership.
07.22.14 ♥ 923

rhamphotheca:

The Texas Blind Snake (Leptotyphlops) is a small blind-snake that lives in the southwestern U.S. and Mexico. These tiny, earthworm-like snakes live in the soil and eat termite and ant larvae. No need to worry about bites…their mouths are too tiny and have almost no teeth.

photo by Sierra Dasilva, Austin, TX

(via: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

07.22.14 ♥ 355

libutron:

Black-headed python

The distinctive Black-headed python, Aspidites melanocephalus (Pythonidae), does indeed have a black head and neck, which contrasts strongly with the brown banding along its body. The banding is light to dark brown or orange-brown on a base that can be creamy white, light brown and occasionally even yellow (as shown in the photo).

It is a large python (up to 250 cm length), endemic to Australia, found in Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia.

Etymology: Aspidites means ‘shield-bearer’, referring to the large scales on the head; and melanocephalus means ’black-headed’.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

Locality: Australia

07.22.14 ♥ 207

libutron:

Pilbara Barking Gecko

Underwoodisaurus seorsus (Carphodactylidae), commonly referred as Pilbara Barking Gecko, is a species endemic to the Pilbara region of Western Australia, recently described in 2011.

The Pilbara Barking Gecko is a large carphodactylid gecko (~100 mm SVL), with large head, long slender limbs and digits. The tail is long (78-95% of SVL), constricted at base but widening posteriorly, terminating in a point.

References: [1] - [2] 

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

Locality: Australia

07.21.14 ♥ 82

But Jazi How Dare You Make a Snake Live in a Tub!

yourhusbandrysucks:

bendragon-cumbersmaug:

bendragon-cumbersmaug:

Okay I have a secret. This:

imageIs not inherently better than this:

image

Actually, for a ball python, the second one is better. They’re terrestrial snakes and really don’t want a lot of floor space. Snakes as a whole aren’t roaming animals. They like to find a nice hole to hide in and they move around when too hot/cold, too wet/dry, or too hungry to stay wherever they’ve hidden. It’s not a matter whether it’s “ghetto” (ugh) or even a “poor man’s tank”- the tub is probably the poor man’s custom reptile cage since those cost several hundred but that’s really where the similarity ends.

Quetzal’s got as much space as he needs and more. He needs space for two hides and a water bowl. He doesn’t need the branches because he’s a terrestrial snake, but I put them in anyway because they still will use them when exploring. He has a lot of floor cover as well which he doesn’t really need but I like giving a shy species plenty of hiding places.

So all of the “that’s kinda ghetto” and “but I’m not poor” responses I get when I suggest that they get a tub instead of fighting with a tank can go away now please.

Now how do I set such a creation up?

image

Well first you buy it and get a soldering iron and something to wipe off the melted plastic. Tub = $16 at Big Lots. Soldering Iron = $7 at RadioShack. Paper towels are easily obtained at a dollar store if you’re that stingy.

imageThen you poke holes in it with the heated iron. You can use a drill bit but that leaves a 90 degree angle on the hole (read: mildly sharp) and the iron leaves a rounded edge which I like better. Wipe off your iron after every hole because melted plastic can and will catch fire if left on too long, plus it starts smoking and smells like balls.

image

I waited 3 hours to make sure that the holes were dried and not letting off fumes. Toxic fumes + sensitive respiratory systems + 1 functional lung = bad things.

I added the substrate, hides, water bowl, and branches after I was sure and set up the cool thermometer.

image

And ground cover! Positioned strategically around the air holes so that ventilation isn’t sacrificed.

image

Bungee cords to keep him inside!  These are very tight and a pain to remove which is unfortunate but whatever works is good for me. Soooo much easier than a tank to set up and maintain. The difference for Q is astounding too, so from now on all of my snakes are going to either be in a tub or in a custom reptile cage. So done with tanks.

If I get one more person protesting tubs because they’re trashy/ghetto/lazy/obviously you have no money/blahblahblah I will skin you and make you into a chew toy for my dog.

WHY DID THIS RESURFACE NO

Because it’s very well done! We’ve been talking about tub enclosures today on my blog so here’s another great example for you peeps of what can be done with tubs.

libutron:

King Cobra

The longest of all living venomous snakes (up to 5.5m long), the magnificent King cobra, Ophiophagus hannah (Elapidae) has been the inspiration for a variety of myths and legends within its native range.

This species is not a true cobra of the genus Naja, and instead belongs to a unique genus Ophiophagus, whose scientific name derives from the Greek for “snake-eating”, in reference to its dietary habits. 

The King cobra has a large range, from India, east to Bangladesh, Myanmar, Cambodia, southern China, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. However, it is regarded as Vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List, and also is listed in CITES Appendix II. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Larsa Darafeyenka

Locality: unknown

07.20.14 ♥ 200